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Welcome to Medicare Under 65

Select SSDI, ESRD, or ALS below:


Disabled man on SSDI needing Medicare

Social Security Disability (SSDI)


"Have you been receiving SSDI for at least 24 months?"


Face of patient with severe kidney failure from diabetes

End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)


Have you been diagnosed with ESRD?


Man with Lou Gehrig's Disease

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)


Have you been diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease?

Medicare is Available for People Under 65

“17% of all Medicare beneficiaries are under 65 years old.”

-Kaiser Family Foundation

You heard somewhere – from a doctor, a friend, a social worker – that you might be eligible for Medicare benefits even though you are not yet 65. You’ve scoured the official Medicare site, the Social Security website, and some related disability sites just for good measure. So why is it that you still can’t determine whether or not you are Medicare-eligible? Both Medicare and some private insurers actually have an incentive to make their eligibility requirements prohibitively complex, leading people like you to remain unsure about your possibility of coverage. This is because Medicare knows that they will have to cover someone for a longer amount of time if they enroll in Medicare before they turn 65, and they tend to receive less money in premiums from them as well.

Welcome to Medicare Under 65, your resource for information on eligibility requirements, disabilities, and Medicare plans for the under 65 population. We have poured over the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) information so you don’t have to. To make things simple, we’ve divided our information into 3 distinct categories:

Social Security Disability (SSDI) - Have you been receiving SSDI for at least 24 months?

End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) - Have you been diagnosed with ESRD?

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclorosis (ALS) - Have you been diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease?

Medicare eligibility for people under 65 years old comes down to these three criteria, each of which are explained in the links provided. For general information on Medicare, including a description of each kind of Medicare plan, please check out our resources page.

Older than 65?
Click here!

*Source: http://www.kff.org/medicare/upload/8100.pdf